Michaels, A. F.. University of Southern California Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, tony@usc.edu
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ECOLOGICAL STOICHIOMETRY IN THE OCEANS: A NECESSARY LINK BETWEEN OCEAN BIOLOGY AND GLOBAL MODELS
 
Ocean carbon cycle models on global scales are a crucial tool for interpreting the present and future uptake of carbon dioxide by the oceans. By their nature, these models incorporate many simplifying assumptions. Most assume that the production of organic matter occurs at a fixed ratio, usually the Redfield ratio. Examinations of data from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) and other sites indicates that there are systematic deviations from these ratios, usually related to specific processes like nitrogen fixation and remineralization. These deviations from a fixed stoichiometry can influence the air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide at comparable levels to the global net oceanic uptake. We know nearly nothing about how these patterns may change through time or if they are part of larger feedback mechanisms to climate. This represents a clear challenge if we hope to forecast future uptake of carbon dioxide in the ocean.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: 04:00 - 04:15pm
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS49WE0400S