Jackson, G. A.. Texas A&M University, gjackson@tamu.edu
Burd, A. A.. Texas A&M University, adrian@halodule.tamu.edu

 
INFERRING CARBON FLOWS IN THE PLANKTON FOOD WEB OF FLORIDA BAY, USA, USING AN INVERSE ANALYSIS
 
Florida Bay, located between the Everglades and the Florida Keys, can be divided into a series of basins separated from each other by shallow mud banks. We have modified the inverse technique of Vezina and Platt to infer the flow carbon through the planktonic food web in some of these basins. The shallowness of the basins, typically 2-4 m at their deepest, makes interactions with the benthos important but poorly constrained flows. Including estimated bacterial metabolic rates in addition to the measured rates of primary production and zooplankton grazing and metabolism as data is important for estimating the benthic interactions. This particular inverse analysis favors short trophic structures and high respiration rates, making it particularly difficult to estimate interactions with the benthos, which are more removed from the primary production carbon source. A weighting scheme to favor longer trophic structures offers an additional tool, besides including bacterial rates, to emphasize benthic interactions in the food web.
 
Day: Monday, Feb. 1
Time: 02:15 - 02:30pm
Location: Eldorado Hotel
 
Code: SS44MO0215E