Trees, C. C. Center for Hydro-Optics & Remote Sensing/SDSU, ctrees@chors.sdsu.edu
Mueller, J. C. Center for Hydro-Optics & Remote Sensing/SDSU, jmueller@chors.sdsu.edu
Maske, H. Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educaion Superior de Ensenada, hmaske@oceanos.cicese.mx
Scott, P. Oregon State University, spegau@oce.orst.edu
Zaneveld, R. Oregon State University, zaneveld@oce.orst.edu

 
REMOTELY SENSED PIGMENT ALGORITHMS IN THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA: A COMPARISONS BETWEEN OCEANIC AND COASTAL AREAS
 
During the past four years, bio-optical data has been collected in the Gulf of California in support of NASA's SIMBIOS program to determine the uncertainty budgets of normalized water-leaving radiances estimated from various ocean color sensors. This is a collaborative program with Oregon State University and our Mexican colleagues at CICESE, Ensenada, and the Universidad de Sonora. Pigment samples were collected for HPLC and fluorometric analyses from four cruises in both oceanic and coastal areas. Over 1,200 samples have been analyzed with monvinyl plus divinyl chlorophyll a (MDVA) concentrations ranging from 0.003 to 5.5 mg m**-3. During the March 1998 cruise several different types of red tides were also sampled with MDVA concentrations ranging from 20 to 30 mg m**-3. The comparison between fluorometric and HPLC pigment analysis showed that fluorometric methods significantly overestimated chlorophyll a concentrations, therefore HPLC pigment analysis is mandatory in these waters. The total pigment accessory pool (chls b & c, carotenoids and phaeopigments) covaried with chlorophyll a concentrations, although ratios of individual pigments to chlorophyll a showed a high degree of variability. Comparisons will be made between remotely sensed ocean color algorithms for oceanic versus coastal areas for estimating pigment concentrations and diffuse attenuation coefficients.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 12:15 - 12:30pm
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS43TU1215S