Barnard, A. H. Oregon State University, abarnard@oce.orst.edu
Zaneveld, J. H. Oregon State University, zaneveld@oce.orst.edu
Pegau, W. Oregon State University, spegau@oce.orst.edu
Cowles, T. J. Oregon State University, tjc@oce.orst.edu

 
ASSESSING A KEY IMPLICIT ASSUMPTION IN OCEAN COLOR REMOTE SENSING ALGORITHMS: OPTICAL HOMOGENEITY.
 
The parameter that is most important to the remote sensing reflectance is the backscattering to total absorption ratio. Most remote sensing algorithms model the backscattering and total absorption coefficients separately. In doing so, the implicit assumption is made that the water column visible by satellites is optically homogeneous, such that the backscattering to absorption ratio is constant over the remote sensing depth. The question that arises from this assumption is how often does optical inhomogeneity actually occur in oceanic waters? We examine in terms of the observed reflectance, when the water column can and cannot be considered to be optically homogeneous for remote sensing purposes. A new parameter called the Optical Homogeneity Index (OHI), is derived to address the validity of assuming a optically homogeneous ocean when vertical structure in the inherent optical properties exists. The OHI is used as an indicator of the degree of error involved in making the above assumption when inverting the remotely sensing radiance.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS43TU0558S