Toole, D. A. Institute for Computational Earth System Science, dede@icess.ucsb.edu
Siegel, D. A. Institute for Computational Earth System Science, davey@icess.ucsb.edu

 
EMPIRICAL AND MECHANISTIC APPROACHES TO UNDERSTANDING OCEAN COLOR VARIABILITY IN THE SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL
 
Understanding the sources of ocean color variability in Case II environments is crucial for the application of remote sensing imagery technologies for examining coastal processes. The Plumes and Blooms project has sampled nearly 200 stations of ocean color and related properties across the Santa Barbara Channel which comprise a wide range of possible conditions and regimes. To assess the sources of variability we performed empirical and mechanistic analyses on above water determinations of remote sensing reflectance and simultaneous determinations of optically active constituents. Statistical analyses for the entire data set indicate that backscattering is important in understanding what regulates ocean color variability. Principal component analysis is employed to isolate how each constituent effects the shape and magnitude of the observed spectra. We developed a method for partitioning the variance which provides a mechanistic understanding of ocean color variability and how it relates to the inherent optical properties. This analysis demonstrates that ultimately, backscattering drives the reflectance signal in this Case II environment. Finally, we present ways in which these results can be extended to aid in the understanding of ocean color processes at other coastal sites.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 04:00 - 04:15pm
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS43TU0400S