Yoder, J. A. GSO, University of Rhode Island, yoder@emu.gso.uri.edu
Kennelly, M. A. GSO, University of Rhode Island, maureen@midori.gso.uri.edu

 
WIND STRESS AND SATELLITE CHLOROPHYLL DISTRIBUTIONS WITHIN THE NORTH ATLANTIC BASIN.
 
Vertical mixing in the upper ocean is one of the important processes regulating biological productivity in the ocean, and satellite sensors now offer the possibility of studying relations between wind stress and phytoplankton biomass at ocean basin scales. The ADEOS satellite mission operated from September, 1996 until June, 1997, and carried the NASA scatterometer (NSCAT) to measure ocean wind vectors and two ocean color scanners (OCTS and POLDER) to measure phytoplankton biomass. We used these measurements to study wind stress and phytoplankton biomass relations in the North Atlantic Basin focusing on the winter-spring transition of 1997. Wind stress was of course stronger in the winter at mid (30 deg.) to high (60 deg.) latitudes, and the spring transition to more moderate winds began in the south and gradually spread north over a ca. 100-day period. This general pattern differed somewhat across the basin and was interrupted at times by periods of more intense wind stress. The seasonal increase in phytoplankton biomass generally tracked the northerly spread of moderating wind stress, as predicted from Sverdrup's critical depth and related theories.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS43TU0295S