Hu, C. University of South Florida, Dept. of Marine Science, (727)553-1103
Biggs, D. Texas A&m University, Dept. of Oceanography, (409) 845-6331
Nadeau, D. University of South Florida, Dept. of Marine Science, (727)553-1103
Muller-Karger, F. University of South Florida, Dept. of Marine Science, (727)553-1103

 
RIVERINE IMPACT ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLOROPHYLL-A AND COLORED DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) IN THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO (NEGOM
 
Bio-optical, chemical, and physical properties of waters of the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico were measured during cruises in May, and July-August 1998, and were studied with concurrent ocean color, SST, and altimeter satellite data to better understand the biological oceanography of this region. Surface chlorophyll-a, CDOM fluorescence, temperature, and salinity were monitored along the cruise track with flow-through systems. Discrete samples for measuring the color of particulate and DOM material were also collected, along with biomass and DOC concentration samples. CDOM fluorescence was highly correlated (0.78, n>6,000) with chlorophyll-a concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 8mg/m3. CDOM fluorescence was also strongly related to salinity (-0.85, n>6,000; salinity range=23-36 psu). We derived preliminary estimates of chlorophyll and CDOM abundance from SeaWiFS ocean color data. We will discuss errors in these SeaWiFS estimates. The altimeter data were useful to detect and map an anticyclonic ring in the NEGOM which affected the distribution of salinity and constituents that affect ocean color. Salinity data confirmed that ocean color patterns seen offshore were related to local rivers. Indeed, the field and SeaWiFS data showed very similar spatial patterns, tracing the path of advection of river plumes offshore around the anticyclone.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 02:45 - 03:00pm
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS43TU0245S