Boissonneault-Cellineri, K. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution /Massachusetts Institute of Technology Joint Program, katieros@mit.edu
Mehta, M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, mausmi@mit.edu
Lonsdale, D. J.. Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, dlonsdale@ccmail.sunysb.edu
Caron, D. A.. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, dcaron@whoi.edu

 
MICROBIAL FOOD WEB INTERACTIONS IN A LONG ISLAND BAY SYSTEM THAT HAS EXPERIENCED RECURRENT NOXIOUS ALGAL BLOOMS
 
Herbivory and bacterivory were experimentally examined in West Neck Bay and Coecles Harbor, Long Island, NY from April through September 1998. Both bays are part of the Peconic Bay System that has been affected sporadically since 1985 by harmful algal blooms of Aureococcus anophagefferens, called brown tides. West Neck Bay is a "hot-spot," often reaching cell concentrations in excess of one million per milliliter. In 1998, a brief brown tide bloom occurred in West Neck Bay, reaching maximal abundances of 880,000 cells/ml. Chlorophyll values averaged 19.4 ug chl. a/liter (max. = > 30 ug chl. a /liter). Coecles Harbor did not experience a brown tide bloom, and chlorophyll values were much lower, averaging 5.6 ug chl. a/liter. The phytoplankton of both bays were dominated by cells <5um in size. Phytoplankton mortality rates ranged from 0.15-1.05 per day, while bacterial grazing rates ranged from undetectable to 1.2 per day. Grazing mortality during the study period was related to bacterial and phytoplankton standing stocks. Microzooplankton removed 11-65% of the standing stock of total phytoplankton. Brown tide specific mortality rates are being analyzed.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS42TH0539S