Kastler, J. A. Louisiana State University, ockast@unix1.sncc.lsu.edu

 
UPTAKE OF DISSOLVED AND SEDIMENTARY ORGANIC CARBON IN AN ESTUARINE ENVIRONMENT
 
Utilization of dissolved and sedimentary organic carbon were compared along a salinity gradient in Barataria Bay, Louisiana in February and June 1998. Water collected at freshwater and saltwater stations was filtered and inoculated with water from the same station containing bacteria. This bacteria inoculant was also mixed with solutions containing organic material removed from suspended and deposited sediment collected at the same locations. Bacteria populations increased in all treatments; variations in the amount of growth in a population were related to differences in the source of the organic material, the time of year it was collected and the location from which it was collected. Maximum growth occurred in flasks containing organic material removed from suspended sediment that was collected at the saltwater site. Flasks containing dissolved organic material experienced relatively low growth, but it is likely to be quantitatively more important than sedimentary organic material because of its abundance in the water column. The importance of sedimentary organic material to water column consumers is related to suspended sediment concentration and organic content, as well as the concentration of dissolved organic carbon in the water.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 09:15 - 09:30am
Location: Eldorado Hotel
 
Code: SS34TU0915E