Collier, R. W. Oregon State University, rcollier@oce.orst.edu
Dymond, J. W. Oregon State University,
Honjo, S. Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst, shonjo@whoi.edu
Manganini, S. Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst,
Francois, R. WOods Hole Oceanographic Inst,

 
THE VERTICAL FLUX OF BIOGENIC AND LITHOGENIC PARTICLES IN THE ROSS SEA DURING THE AESOPS EXPERIMENT
 
The Ross Sea is representative of the Antarctic continental shelf which is a dominant center of productivity in the Southern Ocean. Export flux is also large and comparable to other high productivity areas in lower latitudes. At station Orca, fluxes of organic carbon began increasing in February followed by a larger event in May-June dominated by a massive flux of pteropods. These flux maxima occurred relatively late in the season, and were observed at both 200m and near the bottom at both Orca and to the north at Sei. The total mass flux nearly doubled between 200 and 480 m depth at Orca , with significant contributions of lithogenic material in deeper trap (100 m off the bottom) - especially during the late winter when organic carbon fluxes drop well below 0.1mmol/m*2/day. The fluxes at the northern station Sei were generally 2-3 times less than Orca, although the maximum opal flux of 1.8 mmol /m*2/day, which occurred in late Feb., was similar to the southern station. The pteropod event at Orca reached contributed nearly 5 mmol of organic and 1.5 mmol of carbonate C/m*2/day averaged between mid-April and June. The opal flux was also very high during this period (1.2 mmol /m*2/day).
 
Day: Friday, Feb. 5
Time: 03:45 - 04:00pm
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS31FR0345S