Byers, D. G. Old Dominion University Dept. of Chemistry/Biochemistry, fireduck@pilot.infi.net
Donat, J. G. Old Dominion University Dept of Chemistry/Biochemistry, jdonat@odu.edu
Burdige, D. J. Old Dominion University Dept. of Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, dburdige@odu.edu

 
TOTAL DISSOLVED ZN(TDZN), ZN LIGNDS (L-ZN), AND K'(COND.) FOR ZN COMPLEXES IN THE SEDIMENT PORE WATERS AND BOTTOM WATERS IN CHESAPEAKE BAY AND ELIZABETH RIVER, VA.
 
[TDZn] in Chesapeake Bay pore waters ranged from ~5-60nM. In the mid Bay, [TDZn] in the upper 2cm of the pore waters (~10nM) was ~10x greater than in bottom waters, and remained at ~5 to 15nM down to 15cm. [TdZn] in the upper 2cm in the south Bay was ~2 to 3x greater than the bottom waters, and decreased to ~20nM at 15cm. [TDZn] in Elizabeth River pore waters ranged from ~1-350nM, with profiles similar to the Chesapeake Bay. [TDZn] in the Elizabeth River pore waters was highest in the upper 2cm. [L-Zn] in upper intervals in Chesapeake Bay and Elizabeth River pore waters ranged from ~700 to 2000nM, with K'(cond.) of ~10^7. Porewater [L-Zn] were 100-1000x greater than bottom water concentrations. The large excess of [TDZn] and [L-Zn] in the pore waters suggest that pore waters may be a source of TDZn and L-Zn to overlying waters. TDZn and L-Zn sediment fluxes in the ELizabeth River are currently being determined to investigate this possibility. A comparison of pore water L-Zn, DOC, and Sulfide profiles suggests that Zn-organic complexes dominate near the sediment-water interface. In the deeper intervals at these sites, however, ZN-S complexes may become increasingly important.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS28WE0769S