Paerl, H. W.. Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Instit. of Marine Sciences, Hans_Paerl@unc.edu
Pinckney, J. W.. Texas A&M Univ., Dept. of Oceanography, pinckney@ocean.tamu.edu
Stepper, T. F.. Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Instit. of Marine Sciences, tfs6030@email.unc.edu
Olson, J. B.. Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, JOlson@HBOI.edu

 
MICROBIAL CONSORTIA: STRATEGIES FOR GROWTH AND SURVIVAL IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS
 
Microbial (bacterial, cyanobacterial, microalgal, fungal and protozoan) associations are often the dominant, if not exclusive, units of life under extreme environmental conditions, including chronic nutrient deprivation, desiccation, excessive irradiance, hypersalinity, high and low temperatures. Small size (i.e., high surface area to volume ratios), high metabolic diversity and cryptobiotic capabilites enable microbial associations to exists in structurally-simple, yet physiologically-complex consortial associations. Consortia ensure optimal growth and complete nutrient cycling under potentially-inhibitory ambient conditions. A key to the consortial lifestyles and survival is the formation of biogeochemical gradients within the community matrix. Essential nutrient transformations are reliant on appropriate intra- and inter-cellular oxygen and resultant redox gradients within the matrix. The spatial and temporal requirements for microenvironmental
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 08:30 - 08:45am
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS27TU0830S