Eckert, G. L.. University of California, Santa Barbara, eckert@lifesci.ucsb.edu
, . L.. ,

 
TESTING OLD PARADIGMS: DO MARINE INVERTEBRATE SPECIES WITH FEEDING LARVAE REALLY HAVE SMALLER EGGS, LARGER GEOGRAPHIC RANGES, AND MORE POPULATION VARIABILTY?
 
In the first half of this century, paradigms relating the role of egg size, geographic range, and population dynamics to larval development mode were established. I have collected life history and population dynamics data on a large variety of marine invertebrate species to re-analyze these paradigms. I have compiled life history and geographic range size information on over 700 marine invertebrate species from California to test paradigms relating egg size and geographic range with larval development mode. Preliminary results support the paradigm that egg size is smaller for species with feeding larvae than species with nonfeeding larvae. However, the paradigm that species with feeding larvae have larger geographic ranges than species with nonfeeding larvae is not preliminarily supported. For the analysis of population dynamics, I have calculated variation in over 500 time series of adult and recruit populations from the literature. My results do not support the paradigm that feeding larvae have greater recruitment and population variability. Rather, I find that species with feeding larvae have no difference in recruit variability and less adult population variation than species with nonfeeding larvae. My results support new paradigms on the relationship of geographic range and population variability with larval development mode.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 09:15 - 09:30am
Location: Eldorado Hotel
 
Code: SS26TH0915E