Schindler, D. E. Department of Zoology, University of Washington, deschind@u.washington.edu
Scheuerell, M. E. Department of Zoology, University of Washington, scheuerl@u.washington.edu

 
EFFECTS OF HUMAN ACTIVITIES ON THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF BENTHIC AND PELAGIC CARBON IN LAKE FOOD WEBS
 
Understanding the dynamic linkages between littoral and pelagic food webs in lakes is largely incomplete. Limnological studies usually view fishes as the top predators of pelagic food webs and overlook the importance of benthic food webs in supporting fish production. A survey of >100 lakes across North America showed that benthic food webs supported a variable proportion of fish production but that this proportion was often >75%. This importance of benthic carbon in lake food webs is greatly underrepresented in the views expressed in current limnological papers. Through littoral habitat degradation, eutrophication and exploitation of predatory fishes, human activities change the relative importance of benthic food webs in supporting fish populations in lakes. Alteration of the production base for food webs has important implications for contaminant flows to game fishes, for developing models of food web and ecosystem dynamics, and for conservation of aquatic ecosystems.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 11:45 - 12:00pm
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS22TH1145H