Thompson, R. J. Ocean Sciences Centre, thompson@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
Parrish, C. C. Ocean Sciences Centre, cparrish@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
Deibel, D. Ocean Sciences Centre, ddeibel@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
Choe, N. Ocean Sciences Centre, c56nc@morgan.ucs.mun.ca

 
EFFECT OF A SINKING SPRING BLOOM ON LIPIDS IN SUPRABENTHIC AND BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES IN A COLD OCEAN COASTAL ENVIRONMENT
 
Lipids in 20 species of suprabenthic and benthic invertebrates from 6 phyla were measured during the spring bloom in Conception Bay, Newfoundland to determine the response to a sinking bloom. Samples were collected with a dredge and an epibenthic sled from 3/96 - 7/97. On average the Mysid Erythrops contained the largest amount of lipid (6% wet weight), while the hexacorallian contained the least (0.1%). In Erythrops 75% of the lipids were in neutral (storage) lipids while in the hexacorallian their contents were evenly distributed between neutral and polar (membrane) lipids. Pseudocalanus had the highest essential omega-3 fatty acid proportions (40% total fatty acids) while the stichopodidian had the lowest (21%). The amphipods Acanthostephia and Anonyx responded immediately to the spring bloom by raising total and neutral lipid contents. Other species (e.g. Pseudomma) responded more slowly but continued over a longer period. However, Pseudomma did respond immediately by increasing proportions of omega-3 fatty acids, while others increased their contents later and over a longer period (e.g. Anonyx). Some (e.g. Sagitta) maintained quite similar omega-3 fatty acid levels throughout the sampling period. Thus various strategies are apparently used to sequester lipids in the suprabenthic food web which together may optimize use of the sinking bloom.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time:
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS21WE0520S