Graham, W. M.. Dauphin Island Sea Lab, mgraham@jaguar1.usouthal.edu
, . M.. ,

 
EVIDENCE FOR PHYLOGENETIC CONSTRAINTS OF THE CNIDARIAN BODY PLAN ON JELLYFISH GROWTH RATES: A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON FOOD-LIMITATION
 
Jellyfish growth rates are food-limited and rarely reach a maximum in nature. If it is considered that maximum growth rate is the most adaptive state, then jellyfish must feed in highly concentrated prey patches to reach this state. A set of energetic experiments were conducted on young moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) to determine how energetic balance was maintained when jellyfish were fed at prey concentrations higher than required for a maximal growth rate. At prey concentrations yielding sub-maximal growth, jellyfish growth and respiration rates increased with prey concentration. However, at prey concentrations above what was required to grow maximally, jellyfish growth and respiration rates decreased due to an inability to process/assimilate food within the packed gut. This dome-shaped relationship between prey concentration and growth and respiration suggests these animals might be optimized for natural prey concentrations that do not yield a maximum growth rate. A hypothesis is presented that explains food-limited growth rates in jellyfish as an adaptive strategy imposed by the Cnidarian body plan.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: 04:30 - 04:45pm
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS20WE0430H