Liebig, J. R. GLERL/NOAA, liebig@glerl.noaa.gov
Vanderploeg, H. R. GLERL/NOAA, vanderploeg@glerl.noaa.gov
Carmichael, W. W. Wright State University, wcarmichael@desire.wright.edu
Johengen, T. H. CILER/GLERL/NOAA, johengen@glerl.noaa.gov
Agy, M. A. School of Natural Resources, University of Michigan,

 
FROM INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR TO ECOSYTEM RESPONSE: ZEBRA MUSSEL FILTERING AND MICROCYSTIS BLOOMS
 
Zebra mussels respond to Microcystis in different ways, as suggested by behavioral observations and feeding rate measurements from experiments using natural seston and pure laboratory cultures. One response, the selective rejection of Microcystis, probably has led to Microcystis blooms in Saginaw Bay and Lake Erie. Depending on strain, microcystin content, and colony size, Microcystis can (1) be rejected as pseudofeces, (2) be readily ingested, or (3) lead to cessation of mussel filtering. Rejection requires that the Microcystis colonies are unpalatable to the mussels and are large enough for selective rejection in the presence of small desirable algae. Only certain strains of microcystin-containing Microcystis are unpalatable to the mussels. Thus, selection for a particular strain may have been necessary for the blooms to occur.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: 02:30 - 02:45pm
Location: Eldorado Hotel
 
Code: SS18WE0230E