Ting, J. H. Georgia Institute of Technology, gt4017a@prism.gatech.edu
Kelly, L. H. Georgia Institute of Technology, gt0310a
Snell, T. W. Georgia Institute of Technology, terry.snell@biology.gatech.edu

 
PURIFICATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO MATE RECOGNITION PHEREMONES IN THE MARINE COPEPOD TIGRIOPUS JAPONICUS
 
Behavioral experiments have shown that male copepods of the species Tigriopus japonicus can distinguish conspecifics, gender, and females of different developmental stages using contact chemoreception. Lectin binding patterns on the body surface of females indicate surface bound glycoproteins may be important in mate choice. Treatment of females with trypsin cleaved surface proteins reducing their attractiveness to males. A 150 kD protein fragment released by trypsin was purified to make monoclonal antibodies. One monoclonal bound the terminal urosome and lateral prosome edges of CV females, and its binding significantly decreased female attractiveness to males. Western blotting showed that this antibody bound the trypsin fragment and homogenates of CV females and virgin adult females, but did not bind homogenates of males, CIII females or females of T. californicus. A second monoclonal bound the whole body surface of males, but only the prosome of females, and did not decrease female attractiveness to males. This antibody bound the trypsin fragment as well as homogenates of all stages and genders from T. japonicus, but not homogenates of T. californicus or T. brevicornus females. These antibodies have provided the tools for isolating and characterizing specific surface proteins from copepods that regulate mate recognition.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 11:00 - 11:15am
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS16TH1100H