Doall, M. H. Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, earth1@idt.net
Strickler, J. H. Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, jrs@uwm.edu
Yen, J. Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, jyen@ccmail.sunysb.edu

 
THE SPATIAL-TEMPORAL SCALES OF INTERACTION BETWEEN COPEPODS: IMPLICATIONS FOR SENSORY SYSTEMS AND ENCOUNTER RATES
 
Predatory and mating interactions between free-swimming copepods were videorecorded using laser-illuminated Schlieren optical pathways. Analyses were based on three-dimensional positions of interacting copepods. The predatory calanoid Euchaeta rimana attacked smaller copepods located less than 3 mm (approximately 1.5 bodylengths) from its rostrum, primarily within a cylindrical perceptive volume centered directly anterior to the proximal sections of the first antennae. Hops by females of Acartia hudsonica and Tortanus sp. elicited mating responses from conspecific males over similar reactive distances. In these mating interactions, males closely followed females in a tandem hopping dance before capture. Mating interactions between adults of Temora longicornis commenced over a wider range of reactive distances, with males reacting to females located up to 34 mm away. Males of T. longicornis detected and closely followed chemical trails left along the swimming paths of females. Males of Centropages sp. also followed the swimming trajectories of conspecific females, but over shorter distances than T. longicornis. Our observations support the contention that the strategies through which planktonic copepods locate food and mates are not based on aimless wandering and random contact, but incorporate species-specific behaviors and remote sensing systems that have evolved to increase encounter.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 10:45 - 11:00am
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS16TH1045H