Crimaldi, J. P. Stanford University, crimaldi@leland.stanford.edu
Wiley, M. P. Stanford University, megw@leland.stanford.edu
Koseff, J. R. Stanford University, koseff@ce.stanford.edu

 
DESIGN AND QUANTIFICATION OF A LABORATORY ODOR PLUME FOR USE IN BIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF CHEMICAL SENSING AND TRACKING ALGORITHMS
 
Many marine and freshwater organisms use water-borne chemical cues in a variety of ecologically important activities such as locating food and selecting habitats. The transport of these chemical cues from the source to the organism is often governed by the local hydrodynamics which, in the case of benthic organisms, may be influenced by the bottom boundary layer and surface waves, and the interaction between the two. An understanding of the strategies employed by organisms to both detect and locate chemical cues may provide important insight into the design of autonomous plume-tracking devices. To study these processes in the laboratory, it is necessary to create an artificial odor plume whose primary dynamic characteristics match those in the environment. We use a bed-level momentumless release of fluorescent dye within a turbulent boundary layer in a recirculating flume with and without surface waves to simulate an odor plume. We quantify both the velocity and scalar fields within the plume using a combination of laser-Doppler anemometry and laser-induced fluorescence. We quantify the mean and instantaneous scalar fluxes within the plume, as well as characteristics of the plume scalar structure such as peak instantaneous magnitudes and gradients, peak duration and rise time, and onset slope.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 08:45 - 09:00am
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS16TH0845H