Janssen, J. Loyola University of Chicago, jjansse.it.luc.edu

 
SWIMMING BEHAVIORS OF FISHES WITH WIDE, MEMBRANOUS LATERAL LINE CANALS
 
Deep sea fishes have sensory systems that compensate for the low to negligible light. Systematically diverse taxa have lateral line systems in which the neuromasts are enlarged and enclosed in widened, membrane covered canals. This type of lateral line is less common in freshwater, but occurs in some species that frequent deep or turbid water. In the dark, three such fish (ruffe, troutperch, and pirate perch) use a modified labriform swimming in which the fish makes a stroke with its pectoral fins, then glides with the body straight. Prey are detected during the glide phase. I propose that a membrane covered lateral line canal system can function to eliminate the laminar flowI propose that a membrane covered lateral line canal system can function to eliminate the laminar flow past the neuromast in a gliding fish. As a consequence, the neuromasts are deflected only when the laminar flow is disrupted by currents such as those generated by prey swimming and feeding. In situ video of several fishes with membranous canals including deep-sea fishes and a mesopelagic fish from Lake Baikal show patterns of swimming and/or gliding consistent with the laminar noise reduction hypothesis.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 08:30 - 08:45am
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS16TH0830H