Napp, J. M.. NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, jnapp@afsc.noaa.gov
Brodeur, R. M.. NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, rbrodeur@afsc.noaa.gov
Schumacher, J. D.. Two Crow Consultants, jdschu@pmel.noaa.gov
Stabeno, P. J.. NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, stabeno@pmel.noaa.gov
Jorgensen, E. M.. NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, ejorgens@afsc.noaa.gov

 
ARE RECENT EASTERN BERING SEA ECOSYSTEM ANOMALIES EARLY EVIDENCE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE? WHAT DO RECORDS OF ZOOPLANKTON BIOMASS AND SPECIES COMPOSITION TELL US?
 
Coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean dynamics strongly influence the trophic structure and biological productivity of the eastern Bering Sea shelf. Global warming is predicted to have its greatest impact at high latitudes; shifts in the present mean and variance of critical physical forcing mechanisms (e.g. ocean temperature, sea-ice extent, wind mixing, heat flux) will alter critical habitat for apex predators and the abundant living marine resources that characterize this area. During 1997 the region experienced anomalous conditions in the physical environment concurrent with failures in commercial fisheries, mass mortalities and recruitment failures by piscivorous and planktivorous sea birds, and changes in the summer microplankton assemblage. Is this early evidence for climate change? Our recent time series (1994 - present) of zooplankton biomass and species composition from the eastern Bering Sea shelf will be integrated with historical data from national and international programs from the three previous decades. These data plus environmental time series from the same period will be used to address the question,
 
Day: Monday, Feb. 1
Time: 04:30 - 04:45pm
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS14MO0430H