Stockwell, D. A. SFOS/IMS, University of Alaska Fairbanks, dean@ims.uaf.edu
Whitledge, T. A. SFOS/IMS, University of Alaska Fairbanks, terry@ims.uaf.edu
Stabeno, P. J. NOAA/PMEL, stabeno@pmel.noaa.gov

 
APPARENT NUTRIENT/PHYTOPLANKTON RESPONSES TO UNUSUAL PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN THE SOUTHEAST BERING SEA DURING 1997-1998
 
Anomalous weather patterns characterized the Bering Sea in 1997 and 1998, resulting in massive blooms of Emiliania huxleyi. The occurrence of early stratification in 1997 resulted in the establishment of the pycnocline at a very shallow depth and stimulation of an early spring diatom bloom. With nutrient depletion in the upper mixed layer in early summer, subsequent phytoplankton growth occurred primarily below the upper mixed layer and ultimately depleted nutrients throughout the entire water column. No significant biomass accumulations were observed over the shelf during this time. In mid-summer, apparent nutrient limitation of the warm surface waters allowed for an unusual growth and development of a coccolithophorid bloom. In contrast, the spring of 1998 had exceptionally deep mixing to the bottom resulting in only minor phytoplankton biomass increases and low nutrients. Although different physical mixing conditions were present, the low nutrient environment and coccolithophorid bloom were similar to the previous year. Shipboard experiments and hydrographic transects across the shelf during these two years suggest that the above conditions greatly affected many parts of the shelf ecosystem. The rapid response of the unusual and widespread coccolithophorid bloom may be an analog to possible scenarios of global climate change in northern seas.
 
Day: Monday, Feb. 1
Time: 03:30 - 03:45pm
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS14MO0330H