Grzymski, J. Rutgers University/Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, joeg@ahab.rutgers.edu
Bergmann, T. Rutgers University/Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, bergmann@arctic.rutgers.edu
Mark, M. M. Department of Biology, mmoline@calpoly.edu
Schofield, O. Rutgers University/Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, oscar@ahab.rutgers.edu

 
DECONVOLVING THE INHERENT OPTICAL PROPERTIES FOR NEARSHORE COASTAL WATERS DURING UPWELLING AT LEO-15
 
A goal of the ONR and NOPP-sponsored 1998 Coastal Predictive Skill Experiments was to delineate the impact of upwelling on the in situ optical properties. We measured repetitive profiles with and without a 0.2 micron filter placed inline with a Wetlabs AC-9, which allowed us to determine the relative contributions of dissolved components to total absorption and attenuation. Upwelling in these waters resulted in dramatic increases in light absorption and attenuation. Estimated particulate absorption spectra resembled phytoplankton absorption spectra with distinct shoulders associated with chlorophyll a and accessory carotenoids. Furthermore, the blue:red ratio in the particulate spectra exhibited 10-20% changes with depth suggestive of photoacclimation of the phytoplankton communities. The importance of particulate absorption to total light absorption increased with proximity to shore during an upwelling event. For example, within the upwelling eddy particulate absorption accounted for up to 60-70% of total absorption at 412 nm. In non-upwelled waters, particulate absorption accounted for 30-50% of the total absorption at 412 nm. The relationships between absorption and attenuation were variable in space and time indicating the importance of particulate scattering of light. Not surprisingly scattering was highest in the nearshore waters within the upwelling eddy.
 
Day: Friday, Feb. 5
Time: 11:00 - 11:15am
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS12FR1100H