Noble, R. T. USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, (213)740-8123
Fuhrman, J. T. USC Dept. of Biological Sciences, fuhrman@usc.edu
Michaels, A. USC Wrigley Insitute for Environmental Studies,

 
DETECTION OFINDICATOR VIRUSES IN EFFLUENT-IMPACTED COASTAL WATERS OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BIGHT
 
Non-point source anthropogenic inputs from storm drains in the coastal regions of the Southern California Bight are of potential risk to people who use the waters for recreational purposes. Viruses represent a significant portion of waterborne pathogens, yet little is known about viruses introduced into seawater from non-point source effluents or the relation between viruses and bacteriological water quality. Research using Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT PCR) is now being performed to detect specific types of human enteric viruses (poliovirus, Coxsackie virus, echovirus) and indicator viruses, such as F+ specific coliphage, that are typically associated with fecal contamination. Assays for the quantitation of total and fecal coliforms and enterococcus, as well as total viral and bacterial counts by epifluorescence microscopy will provide data for correlation analyses. Previous results have indicated that positive virus detection is more likely after a heavy rain, although there was no direct and evident correlation between the presence of human enteric viruses and the number of indicator bacteria in the samples. Advancements in methods, along with results of viral analyses and comparisons to bacterial indicators will be discussed.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 12:00 - 12:15pm
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS10TH1200S