Precht, W. F.. LAW Engineering & Environmental Services, Inc., bprecht@lawco.com
Aronson, R. F.. Dauphin Island Sea Lab, raronson@jaguar1.usouthal.edu

 
DISEASE, HUMAN ACTIVITY AND THE CHANGING FACE OF CARIBBEAN CORAL REEFS
 
Coral reefs of the Caribbean have been in a state of flux for the past two decades. In particular, two important reef-building coral species, Acropora palmata and A. cervicornis, have been decimated. The Acropora mass martality can be attributed to a regional outbreak of White-Band Disease. Whether this disease and its associated population collapse is natural or the result of human disturbance is a subject of controversy. A. cervicornis populations,have been especially affected and locally eliminated from many reefs. Paleoecological surveys indicate the mass mortality of the acroporids to be a novel event in the late Holocene. If these changes are unique in the late Holocene history in Caribbean reefs, then a possible connection between White-Band Disease and human activity should be further investigated.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 09:45 - 10:00am
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS10TH0945S