Barber, R. T.. Duke University, barber@duke.edu
, . T.. ,

 
WHY IS AQUATIC EPIDEMIOLOGY CHANGING NOW? HAS A CHANGING CLIMATE PLAYED A KEY ROLE?
 
In the last two decades there have been increases in the frequency, intensity and range of outbreaks of a wide spectrum of aquatic microorganisms, including but not limited to coral, amphibian and human pathogens as well as harmful algal blooms. In addition, the appearance of novel strains and species of these organisms has increased. The frequency, intensity and range of these organisms began to change in the mid-1970s, particularly around 1976. Is the simultaneous change in background outbreak rate of these unrelated organisms a coincidence? About 1976 there was a major climate regime shift in the Northern Hemisphere that was reflected most clearly in the change in strength of the North Pacific and North Atlantic pressure systems. One consequence of this regime shift occurred in the Sahel region of Africa, where a prolonged drought increased by about a factor of five the global supply of dust to the atmosphere. Because this dust is iron-rich, its eolian transport to typically iron-poor aquatic regions may have caused a significant change in nutrient chemistry. Does the timing of this fundamental nutrient change account for the timing of the outbreak rate changes in aquatic epidemiology?
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: 08:30 - 09:00am
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS10TH0830S