Hixon, M. A.. Oregon State University, hixonm@bcc.orst.edu
, . A.. ,

 
WHY BIOLOGISTS AND PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHERS MUST COOPERATE TO PRODUCE EFFECTIVE MARINE PROTECTED AREAS
 
For a marine protected area to be sited effectively, major exogenous impacts borne by currents flowing into a reserve must be known, as well as the fate of propagules flowing out of the reserve. Important inputs include pelagic larvae, nutrients and planktonic food, water masses of varying temperature and salinity, and pollutants. Particularly crucial is larval flux because replenishment of local populations of most larger marine organisms depends entirely on propagules spawned somewhere upstream, well beyond the local system. Because propagules are largely planktonic, knowledge of the physics of larval transport is essential for determining which sites are likely to be effective larval sources and sinks for use as marine protected areas. In our studies of reef fish populations in the Bahamas and French Polynesia, it is clear that local currents, tidal flux, and even swell size and direction play major roles in determining which sites are adequately replenished by incoming larvae. In the future, we will need to track larval flux between sources and sinks, thereby mapping the linkage between local populations. Clearly, physical oceanography plays a crucial role in understanding the population dynamics of marine organisms that we seek to conserve.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: 02:15 - 02:30pm
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS09WE0215S