Mayer, M. S. St. Lawrence University, mmay@ccmaillink.stlawu.edu
Mills, E. S. Cornell Biological Field Station, elm5@cornell.edu
Moore, A. St. Lawrence University,

 
THE EFFECT OF WATERSHED SIZE AND LANDUSE ON THE WATER AND NUTRIENT INPUTS OF TRIBUTARIES TO ONEIDA LAKE
 
For Oneida Lake, the largest lake within New York state, the apparent importance of watershed size and landuse in determining the inputs of tributaries to the lake differed for water, nitrate and total phosphorus. The seasonal pattern of these inputs also varied. Watershed size explained most (> 95% and 80%) of the variation among tributaries in their annual contributions of water and nitrate to Oneida Lake. Waterflow and the input of total phosphorus were less tightly coupled. Watershed size explained little of the variation among tributaries in their annual contributions of total phosphorus to the lake. Landuse appeared to dominate the loading of total phosphorus to the lake. The percentage of the watershed in cropland could explain most (> 80%) of the variation among tributaries in their total phosphorus input on a per unit watershed area basis. The percentage of the watershed in cropland had a weaker relationship to nitrate input per unit area. The dissolved versus dissolved plus particulate nature of nitrate versus total phosphorus may partly explain the apparent difference in regulation and timing of their loading and differences in how loading is tied to waterflow.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS07TU1193S