Seitzinger, S. P. Rutgers University, sybil@imcs.rutgers.edu
Kroeze, C. P. Wageningen Agricultural University, Carolien.Kroeze@wimek.cmkw.wau.nl

 
GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION OF N INPUTS TO COASTAL MARINE ECOSYSTEMS IN 1990 AND PROJECTIONS FOR THE YEAR 2050
 
Anthropogenic activity has markedly affected N inputs to coastal ecosystems. In the current study the global distribution of N inputs to coastal ecosystems was modeled as a function of N inputs to watersheds. N inputs from fertilizer, human sewage, and atmospheric deposition were considered. About 8% of the total N inputs to the terrestrial environment can be accounted for as DIN export by rivers. Model estimated export of DIN by world rivers to estuaries in 1990 is 20.8 Tg N/yr; approximately 75% is estimated to be anthropogenic. DIN export to the Atlantic and Indian Oceans is similar (5.4 Tg N/yr and 4.6 Tg N/yr, respectively); inputs to the Pacific are approximately 50% greater. China and southeast Asia account for over 50% of DIN export by world rivers. Approximately 90% of DIN inputs are in the northern hemisphere. Projections of population density, fertilizer use and NOy deposition for the year 2050 were used to estimate future changes in the global distribution of DIN export. DIN inputs were estimated to more than double by the year 2050. The largest absolute increases in DIN export are predicted for India and China, with large relative increases in Africa and South America as well.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 09:00 - 09:15am
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS07TU0900S