Newton, J. A. Washington State Dept. of Ecology/Univ. Washington, newton@ocean.washington.edu
Albertson, S. A. Washington State Dept. of Ecology,

 
EVALUATING CAUSES FOR CHANGES IN BOTTOM-WATER DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN HOOD CANAL, A TEMPERATE FJORD-LIKE ESTUARY IN WASHINGTON STATE
 
Hood Canal, in western Puget Sound, Washington State, has long been known for low dissolved oxygen in its bottom waters, based on measurements made during the 1930's to 60's. It is 50 km long, 2 km wide, an average of 100 m deep, with an entrance sill of 50 m depth. Tidal forcing is strong, but does not destroy the haline stratification. Nutrients are exhausted during the summer. Due to these attributes and its long, narrow and deep form, a seasonal depletion of oxygen would be predicted. However, in the last decade, State monitoring data show that low oxygen concentrations persist nearly year-round, unlike the seasonal pattern found in the historical data. From a series of cruises spanning four years we are trying to evaluate whether eutrophication or changes in the estuarine circulation, possibly due to freshwater diversion, could be forcing this change. In this and the following talk (Albertson et al.) we will present results from these studies.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS07TU0298S