Houde, E. D.. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, ehoude@cbl.umces.edu
Jech, M. D.. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, jech@glerl.noaa.gov
Leach, S. D.. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, leach@cbl.umces.edu
Madden, A. P.. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, madden@cbl.umces.edu
Sanford, L. P.. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, lsanford@hpl.umces.edu
Jung, S. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, jung@cbl.umces.edu

 
LARVAL RETENTION AND YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR FISH PRODUCTION IN ESTUARINE RETENTION-ENTRAPMENT FEATURES OF CHESAPEAKE BAY
 
Physical features define spawning areas and promote production of young-of-the-year fish. In Chesapeake Bay, two persistent features, the Estuarine Turbidity Maximum (ETM) in the upper bay and a cyclonic eddy (CE) in the lower bay, support recruitment of anadromous fishes and bay anchovy, respectively. The ETM is situated near the salt front. Entrapped sediments are periodically resuspended by tides and levels of zooplankton suitable for larval fish feeding are high in the ETM. Larvae of striped bass, white perch, and river herrings are accumulated in the ETM region where many remain for 150 days, growing through early juvenile stages. Diets differ and feeding success of juveniles is improved in the ETM and immediately downbay of it compared to upbay areas. The CE is relatively rich in plankton and consistently holds highest abundances of bay anchovy eggs and larvae, indicating that adults select the feature to spawn. Anchovy larvae of all sizes (0 to 35 days old) are retained in the CE, but transforming larvae and juveniles disperse subsequently upbay. While the ETM and CE differ remarkably in their physical attributes, each serves a critical role in promoting retention-dispersal mechanisms that insure recruitment of Chesapeake Bay fishes.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS04TH1684S