Yen, J. Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, jyen@ccmail.sunysb.edu
Strickler, J. Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, jrs@uwm.edu
Doall, M. H. Marine Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, earth1@idt.net

 
BREAKING THE CODE: DECIPHERING BIOLOGICAL SIGNALS FROM SMALL-SCALE TURBULENCE
 
Copepods (1-10 mm), a dominant member of the zooplankton and important in marine food webs, leave detectable hydrodynamic signals when they move through water. These cues can provide information that reveal the presence of a lunging predator, an escaping prey, or an attractive mate. Female copepods leave chemical signals in their wake to insure that their mate does not confuse her trail for a common vortex tube. When creating a feeding current, copepods organize their immediate fluid environment by generating a laminar flow field which smoothes out small-scale turbulence. This biological activity enhances the signal-to-noise ratio, allowing zooplankters to recognize and spatially-locate signals in their three-dimensional space, the ocean.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS02TU0510S