Quinlan, J. A.. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, jaq@marine.unc.edu
Werner, F. A.. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, cisco@marine.unc.edu
Lough, R. Northeast Fisheries Science Center, greogry.lough@noaa.gov
Buckley, L. J.. Northeast Fisheries Science Center, lbuckley@gsosun1.gso.uri.edu
Gallager, S. M.. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, sgallager@whoi.edu

 
EXAMINING THE COHORT LEVEL IMPLICATIONS OF SMALL SCALE TURBULENCE, PREY FIELD AND SELECTIVITY: A STUDY OF LARVAL COD AND HADDOCK ON GEORGES BANK
 
Turbulence, prey distribution and prey selection play important roles in the feeding ecology of larval fish. However, it is less clear how the interaction of these factors influences the growth and size distribution of a cohort, or the stomach contents of an individual. This is especially the case when transport processes advect larvae through space- and time-variable prey and turbulence fields. We present results of a modeling study examining the effects of key physical variables and the larval feeding environment on the growth of a cohort of larval cod and haddock on Georges Bank. This study advances previous efforts [Werner et al. (1996); Deep Sea Research II 43:1793-1822] by investigating the role that selection may play in governing larval growth rates and size. In particular, we examine selection in terms of prey type, handling time, satiation, visual perception and encounter rate. Using the observed distributions of several species of copepod to specify the prey distribution, a realistic three-dimensional time-dependent model of the flow and turbulence fields, and an individual-based bioenergetics model of larval cod and haddock, we explore interactions between processes and compare the modeled growth rates and stomach contents of the larvae to those observed in the field.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 02:15 - 02:30pm
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: SS01TU0215H