Hameed, S. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Marine Sciences Research Center, hameed@atmsci.msrc.sunysb.edu
Piontkovski, S. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Marine Sciences Research Center, spiontkovski@notes.cc.sunysb.edu
Conversi, A. ENEA, Marine Environmental Center, conversi@estosf.santateresa.enea.it

 
IMPACT OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CENTERS OF ACTION ON THE GULF STREAM AND ZOOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC
 
The Gulf Stream flows north almost parallel to the American coast but turns eastward near North Carolina bringing warm waters to large sections of the North Atlantic. Recently Taylor and Stephens have shown that the latitude at which it turns eastward ( the northwall ) is related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) with a lag of two years. The NAO represents fluctuation of the pressure gradient between the Azores High (AH) and the Icelandic Low (IL), the two major atmospheric centers of action in the North Atlantic. Descriptions of oceanic variations in terms of the of the atmospheric centers of action yields more information than the use of a pressure gradient index such as the NAO. We illustrate this approach by presenting a statistical model relating the northwall to the Azores High and the Icelandic Low with lags of two and zero years, respectively. Use of the individual centers of action helps localize the physical explanation of the results. For example, copepod abundance in the C1 region of the CPR survey ( located in the North Sea ) is related to pressure fluctuations of the IL, and not to the AH.
 
Day: Tuesday, Feb. 2
Time: 03:30 - 03:45pm
Location: Hilton of Santa Fe
 
Code: CS67TU0330H