Booth, M. G.. Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, booth@skio.peachnet.edu
Miller, R. G.. Oklahoma State University, rum67@okway.okstate.edu

 
DEVELOPMENT AND FURTHER CHARACTERIZATION OF A MOLECULAR TOOL TO MONITOR DNA REPAIR IN UVR-STRESSED BACTERIOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES: RECA EXPRESSION IN VITRO AND IN SITU
 
For numerous reasons, the RecA protein is an excellent molecular candidate for monitoring stress responses in marine bacterioplankton communities. Previously, this protein has been shown to respond to environmentally-relevant ultraviolet radiation (UVR). It's behavior appears to be correlated to the amount of DNA damage incurred as well as cellular viability. However, in vitro, the response of RecA to solar UVR appears to be much more complex. Debate has arisen as to whether the longer regions of solar-UVR (UVA) result in significant damage to plankton communities. In order to determine RecA's response to discrete segments or wavelengths within the UVR spectrum, studies employing artificial UV lamps and an Alexandrite laser were compared to results from microcosm experiments in the Gulf of Mexico and the Gerlache Straits, Antarctica. RecA is induced by all wavetypes and is not wavelength dependent. However, its expression in response to UVA in vitro does not appear as significant as microcosm studies indicate. Various marine bacterial isolates respond diversely to UVA and UVB. This study demonstrates that RecA expression is a suitable monitor of repair, particularly when correlated with damage assessment. However, individual species' responses cannot be extrapolated to predict future UVR effects on natural marine assemblages.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: CS65WE1549S