Yocis, B. H. Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, BYocis@bigelow.org
Matrai, P. H. Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, PMatrai@bigelow.org
Groszko, W. Dalhousie University, groszko@atm.dal.ca

 
METHYL BROMIDE PRODUCTION DURING SPRING BLOOM IN THE GULF OF MAINE, USA
 
Concern about declining ozone concentrations in the atmosphere in the last two decades has led researchers to look for compounds that destroy ozone, other than chlorofluorocarbons. One such compound is methyl bromide (CH3Br) which is presently believed to be the largest source of Br in the stratosphere. The major natural source of CH3Br to the troposphere appears to be marine, biogenic production and subsequent sea-air exchange. The oceans play an important and complex part in controlling the tropospheric burden of methyl bromide. Sea surface can act both as a source and a sink to the atmosphere. In order to eventually determine the net availability of dissolved CH3Br for air-sea exchange, we first need to understand the various compartments and mechanisms involved. We present here production rates of methyl bromide measured during a spring cruise in the Gulf of Maine and Massachusetts Bay, covering waters from early to full spring bloom, with phytoplankton populations including dinoflagellates and/or diatoms.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: CS62TH0479S