Madden, C. J.. Sth. Florida Water Mgt., chris.madden@sfwmd.gov
, . J.. ,

 
PATTERNS OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN NORTHEASTERN FLORIDA BAY WATERS AT REGIONAL AND LOCAL SCALES: EFFECTS ON PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY
 
Chlorophyll, salinity, temperature, water clarity, dissolved oxygen, and pH were measured in high-resolution 2-D transects in northeastern Florida Bay to assess water management effects on water quality, light climate and estuarine primary production. Managed changes in Everglades hydrology enhance freshwater inputs to the system, which are influenced by both marine and fresh waters, potentially high suspended sediments, nutrients and carbonates. Water clarity was measured by flow-through transmissometer and chlorophyll concentration as in vivo fluorescence. The estuary is characterized by turbidity fronts, diffuse freshwater sources, and large phytoplankton patches. Strong differences in phytoplankton chlorophyll were measured in eight sub-basins. Bimonthly maps of parameters in 1997 showed while all other basins averaged 30 PSU, the westernmost dropped to 17 in May as the rainy season began, suggesting it received the earliest and largest pulse of freshwater from Taylor Slough. Freshwater generally correlated with low mineral turbidity and high chlorophyll indicative of enhanced productivity at fronts of elevated nutrients and reduced turbidity: algal blooms occurred early in the western area, averaging 40-200% higher chlorophyll than eastern basins through summer. However, eastward at Taylor River mouth, though chlorophyll correlated with low salinity, overall production was low, possibly due to reduced P availability.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: 11:15 - 11:30am
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: CS59WE1115S