Sutula, M. Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, msutula@unix1.sncc.lsu.edu
Day, J. Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, ceiday@lsuvm.sncc.lsu.edu
Childers, D. Department of Biology, Florida International University, childers@fiu.edu
Rudnick, D. Everglades Systems Research Division, Ecosystem Restoration Dept. ,S. Florida Water Management District, drudnic@sfwmd.gov

 
HYDROLOGICAL RESTORATION OF THE SOUTHERN EVERGLADES AND ITS EFFECTS ON FRESHWATER MARSH AND ESTUARINE NUTRIENT BUDGETS
 
Hydrological restoration of the southern Everglades will result in increased freshwater flow to Florida Bay. Restoration projects include freshwater diversion from the L-31W canal to Taylor Slough, and increased overland flow by removal of levees from the C-111 canal. We assessed the contribution of surface water flow and the probable impact of the freshwater diversion on the nutrient budget of the freshwater and estuarine wetlands of the southern Everglades. We calculated 1997 inputs and outputs of water, TP and TN to the southern Everglades, including surface water input and export to Florida Bay, precipitation, and evapotranspiration. Groundwater contribution to the budget was estimated as the difference between input and output terms, and verified against field measurements. Preliminary results show that surface water made a significant contribution to nutrient inputs; of that quantity, however, 92-98% was exported to Florida Bay. Comparison of 1997 flow-weighted mean concentrations in headwaters versus discharge to Florida Bay shows a decrease of 8% TN and 5% TP seaward, suggesting that the wetland is a net sink for nutrients. The high throughflow rate, and the small decrease in nutrients indicates that nutrient levels, particularly phosphorus have been depleted to near ambient levels before/as they enter the watershed.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: CS59WE1054S