Vargo, G. A. Univ. of South Florida, vargo@seas.marine.usf.edu
Hitchcock, G. L. Univ. of Miami, RSMAS, gary@oj.rsmas.miami.edu
Neely, M. University of South Florida, mneely@seas.marine.usf.edu
Jurado, J. Univ. of Miami, RSMAS, jjurado@oj.rsmas.miami.edu
Melahn, L. University of South Florida, lmelahn@seas.marine.usf.edu
Mir, D. University of Miami,

 
ESTIMATES OF PHYTOPLANKTON GROWTH, PRODUCTION, AND NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS BASED ON A DRIFTER TRACKED WATER PARCEL IN WESTERN FLORIDA BAY, USA
 
This study is one part of a larger program to determine the role of advective nutrient flux in meeting the nutrient demands of phytoplankton in western Florida Bay and the Southwest Florida Shelf south of Cape Romano. One phase of this program utilizes tracer/drifter studies to track a parcel of water in which phytoplankton growth and loss estimates along with dissolved and particulate nutrient availability are followed. A series of CODE-type drifters was deployed in the channel between East Cape Sable and Sandy Key. During the first two days their trajectories displayed a series of East-West tidal ellipses within the channel but, after two days, all drifters migrated into a North-South trajectory along the western bounday of Florida Bay. Samples were taken twice daily for dissolved inorganic and organic nutrients, particulate carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and chlorophyll-a. Production, and therefore nutrient requirements, are based on phytoplankton growth rates estimated from cage cultures and dilution gradient experiments combined with changes in biomass within the patch of water tracked by the drifters. Potential nutrient input from the Shark River, located north of the study area, is derived from property-salinity relationships. Low growth rates and essentially steady-state biomass characterized the community in June, 1998.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time:
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: CS57TH0620S