Schaefer, T. L. Louisiana State University, tschaef@lsu.edu
Power, J. L. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, power@mail.cor.epa.gov

 
SPATIAL PATTERNS OF LARVAL TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION IN A LOUISIANA COASTAL BAY, USA
 
The U.S. Louisiana coastline is a series of barrier islands separating large inshore embayments from Gulf of Mexico. Estuarine dependence is a common life history in this region, where residence of early life history stages in coastal bays either precedes or follows an offshore, neritic phase. Ingress through tidal passes is a critical component of the life history, but must then also be followed by retention in, and dispersal through, the coastal bays. Field studies of within-estuary transport were conducted in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Drifter tracking was conducted during the summers of 1994 through 1996. A total of 22 tracking sessions lasting up to a full tidal cycle were completed using clusters of 4 to 9 drifters per track. Individual drifter positions were determined approximately every thirty minutes using a GPS receiver with differential correction. The analytical methodology of Okubo and coworkers was used to compute Lagrangian deformations and turbulent diffusivities from the drifter positions. Graphical results from these analyses will be presented and interpreted with respect to probabilities of successful retention, transport, and settlement of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) megalopae within Barataria Bay.
 
Day: Friday, Feb. 5
Time: 10:30 - 10:45am
Location: Eldorado Hotel
 
Code: CS57FR1030E