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imageIn both of these information statements, association of the commercial interest with leading scientists is acknowledged as being a very important component of the plan, and I think we can all appreciate why that association is important.

imageHere is a quote from the Carboncorp page: "Plankton, largely diatoms, sinks out of the ocean euphotic zone within a few weeks on its way to the seabed, safely sequestering carbon from the atmosphere in ocean sediment."

Statements like this require careful consideration by scientists.

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A different plan also merits consideration by scientists. Members of the Ocean Technology Group at the University of Sydney (Australia) have proposed ocean fertilization with ammonium as a method for sequestering carbon dioxide in the sea. According to information provided in a press release, this idea has been proposed to The World Bank for waters off Chile with partners from Columbia University and the University of Concepcion in Chile. The idea is to pump four molar concentrations of ammonium into shelf waters through a diffuser. This is expected to fertilize four billion square meters. In other words, fertilization of coastal waters with nitrogen will provide food (through enhanced fish production) and sequester carbon.

Following on my theme of claims and of possible challenges, there's certainly another view that exists about putting nitrogen into coastal environments, or into any part of the marine environment. This is from the Baltimore Sun, which published a very well researched special supplement describing the production of nitrogen for fertilization throughout the world, and the tremendous problems that are associated with it. The title of the special supplement was, "Feeding The World, Poisoning the Planet" and there is a big algae bloom in the background.

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It is safe to say that there's a range of opinion about the issues I have discussed. Scientific uncertainties abound, and I've tried to avoid getting mired in scientific details. As you may already know, there are really complicated scientific questions regarding carbon sequestration research-and how the ocean responds to fertilization.

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This is a list of natural biological situations in the ocean. There are places where there's very low turbulence and very low nutrients. It's like those blue waters in the central ocean. There are areas with well-mixed waters, high nutrients, and high turbulence. This happens in association with the spring bloom. Water mixes during the winter, bringing up nutrients from the deep ocean, and during the spring there's a lot of phytoplankton growth.

imageAnd then there are also areas of high turbulence and low nutrients, low turbulence and high nutrients. In the natural order of things of the ocean, there are fundamentally different ecosystem types in these different regimes of nutrients and turbulence. In the ocean, nutrients and high productivity go hand-in-hand with turbulence.

These high-nutrient, high-turbulence environments are the ones that are associated with fish production and high productivity.

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